Archive for December, 2012

Top Songs of 2012

Last year was my first musical BestOf list (outside of that 1980s “Desert Island Discs” for Tower Records mag). Nice to have the darn thing to look back upon, for better or worse, even if its only me that references it. One time is an ‘incident’, and two might be a ‘trend’. Here is my ranked iPod playlist for 2012 releases:

  1. Bad Books – Forest Whitaker
  2. Alabama Shakes – Hold On
  3. The Gaslight Anthem – “45”
  4. Regina Spektor – How
  5. Jack White – Freedom At 21
  6. Pennywise – Let Us Hear Your Voice
  7. Phillip Phillips – Home
  8. passEnger – Let Her Go
  9. Morning Parade – Headlights
  10. Imagine Dragons – It’s Time
  11. Allen Stone – Sleep
  12. Royal Teeth – Wild
  13. Beach House – Myth
  14. Fun. – We Are Young
  15. Youngblood Hawke – We Come Running
  16. Passion Pit – Take A Walk
  17. Garbage – Blood For Poppies
  18. Ho Hey – The Lumineers
  19. The Tallest Man On Earth – Revelation Blues
  20. Atlas Genius – Trojans
  21. The Heavy – What Makes A Good Man?
  22. The Chevin – Champion
  23. Bloody Mary – Silversun Pickups
  24. Slightly Stoopid – Top Of The World
  25. Tennis – Origins

The big thing that stands out compared to last year is the lack of “Top 40″. Carly Rae Jepson, Neon Trees, Kelly Clarkson, Drake, Pink – even Green Day not having sufficient numbers. I attribute this to the discovery of AltNation on Sirius/XM in my new car. My trial subscription is almost over, and since I can’t see spending $15/mo essentially just for one radio station, it looks like I’ll be back to Spotify, Pandora, 91X, and KPRI in 2013.

And speaking of Spotify, a playlist for the above…

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$ufficiently Indi$tingui$hable From Magic

I bought my Dad an AppleTV for Christmas. An avid travel photographer, the intent was to use it to replace the Windows-based HP Media Smart “appliance” that he used for viewing streamed photos on the TV. (The HP worked great for a long while, but eventually stopped being able to index and display new photos – probably because there were so many.) Something else was needed, and perhaps the AppleTV would fit the bill?

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Keeping Track of iSCSI LUNs as Multipath Devices

The Dell MD3200i is a very flexible mid-level iSCSI SAN. With 12 bays (up to 3TB NearLine SAS in each) and dual quad-port controllers, it offers excellent redundancy, capacity, and expandability. The Windows or Linux MD Storage Manager provides a decent GUI from which to define disk groups of various RAID styles and virtual volumes within each disk group for future filesystems.

But for all the labeling controls that MDSM offers for groups and volumes, the LUN mappings (to allocate volumes to iSCSI IP connections) are the real exposed labels. No matter how anal-retentive you get with group/volume hierarchy, all the ‘naming’ that the iSCSI initiators will ever see are the LUN numbers 0-31.

In an iSCSI system, there could be multiple ways to reach LUNs (via multiple network interfaces). For this reason, multipath support is used to provide route management and redundancy. On CentOS, filesystems are accessed via the multipath /dev/mapper device naming, mapped to the ‘physical’ iSCSI LUN. How are these mappings managed? ‘mpatha‘, ‘mpathb‘, ‘mpathc‘, etc are assigned first-come first-served to LUNs in the order they are discovered. This can make it difficult when adding multiple LUNs at the same time, because it is not entirely obvious which /dev/mapper/mpath device corresponds to which partition (despite all that effort you employed in creatively naming your MD3200i groups and volumes).

Because of my momentary confusion in regard to this LUN mapping, I thought that I would document the iSCSI implementation steps as performed on CentOS 6:

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