Tag: android

Has The iPhone Peaked?

Business Insider ran what I thought was a very interesting Android vs iPhone survey asking users why they chose one platform over another. I agree with their “takeaway points” from the resulting data, but I was particularly intrigued by two of their extended conclusions in regard to the Android onslaught:

  1. “It increases the pressure on the iPhone 5 to be a humdinger of an upgrade.”
  2. “App selection is not as important as most people think.”

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On Openness, Fragmentation, And Other Android Traits

According to the latest Nielsen numbers, Android, iOS, and BlackBerry are nearly neck-and-neck in smartphone OS market share with 29%, 27%, and 27% respectively. When looking at the graph, one thing stands out in comparing new leader Android to its nearest neighbors… (continue reading…)


Android vs iPhone, Fair and Balanced

Nick Saint offers the most unbiased Android vs iPhone comparison that I have seen to date. It is well-balanced and (IMHO) reasonable in its assessment. The comments pre-date the iPhone availability of Google Voice, Google Goggles, or the potential “Verizon iPhone” – which might ameliorate some criticisms – but otherwise it is very fair.

I have hated all other “which is best” articles because they are so black-and-white in stating their personal preferences as fact. Don’t let anyone tell you that you are somehow less intelligent/attractive/moral if you prefer to have a virtual keyboard (iPhone) or removable battery (Android). There is no one right answer, no universal choice. Whatever you prefer is right for you, no matter what anyone else may opine.


AT&T Re-Defines “Limited” and “Unlimited”

Most iPhone users tend to be loyal about their phone, and dare I say, with just a slight air of superiority. But there is one feature on Android phones that Apple people are jealous about. Many Android phones come with software that allows the phones to become a WiFi hotspot. Not only is the feature built-in, but the carriers gladly support it. It is even advertised heavily in “Droid Does” commercials.

But iPhone? (continue reading…)


The Evolution Of Smartphones, By The Numbers [And Why Apple May Dominate The Next Round]

In 2007, Apple energized the smartphone industry with the introduction of the first-gen iPhone. Within a year, they had gone from a non-player in the cellular phone market to an innovative industry leader. Indeed, Apple’s tremendous success in the marketplace is exemplified by their capture of 48% of the Q1 2010 mobile phone revenues, despite being limited to GSM carriers and garnering only an estimated 3% of the total handset market.

If rumors of a CDMA phone in 2011 are correct, Apple is poised to once again make an historic leap, this time not for its innovative technological advances, but in terms of a significant – possibly even dominant – market share increase. In order to explain why this might be, we need to understand how smartphone adoption has evolved (very rapidly) over the past 3 years.

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Counting Down To The Top 3

Ouch. First Microsoft unceremoniously kills the Kin device, and now the press buries the first Windows Phone 7. If sales will tank as predicted, is MS long for the mobile market?

Lackluster Windows Phone adoption will ultimately reduce the smartphone competition to Apple iOS, Google Android, and the forthcoming BlackBerry 6.0. As for WebOS? HP does not plan to focus on smartphones and will instead push for it as the embedded OS on all their future appliance platforms (particularly tablets).

Soon there will be three. (And quite frankly, I am seeing RIM wilt quickly under the weight of the  iPhone/Droid onslaught. If Corporate America ever concedes their love affair with the BlackBerry Enterprise Server as a means of Draconian IT control, BB is toast.)


Smartphone Tethering

Long ago, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, computers went on-net – whether “on net” was “the Internet”, CompuServe, or (for the old-timers) something like FIDOnet – with a device called a “modem”. (Modems got their name because they MOdulated and DEModulated analog telephone signals to transmit binary data.)

In  these days of digital high-speed broadband and FIOS, a genuine “mo-dem” is somewhat of an ancient relic in the vernacular. However, if you have a smartphone, it can act as an analog (no pun intended) of an old-school telephony modem for getting your laptop onto the Internet when there is no other access available.

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Apple Now, Google Later?

In a survey of 2700+ mobile computing developers from an admittedly non-Apple centric developer base, the Appcelerator results shows that while iOS is king of the “now”, Android is perceived as more open and potentially with greater features in the future.

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Ready For The Enterprise? Uh, Yeah.

Is Android 2.2 enterprise-ready? Ultimately, with input from the usual suspects like Gartner, Information Week concludes “yes”. My favorite quote:

“iPhones and Android are coming to the enterprise, whether IT likes it or not.”

Um, they’re already here. The small- to mid-size firms have already elected to skate on that bleeding edge. Most of the features the pundits say are lacking are mainly a concern for only the largest of organizations bound and determined to command their IT with an iron fist (and a Blackberry Enterprise Server). And I have a sneaking suspicion that once the powers-that-be in such an org actually get to see/use something like Android or iPhone, the ‘standard’ will turn on a dime. Or more hypocritically, the standard will remain the same for all, but that exec will get a special dispensation from IT.


Android As *The* Mobility Platform

In 1Q 2010, Android unit sales surpassed the iPhone. Is this a harbinger of Android as the dominant smartphone platform? And what of mobile computing in general? The iPhone OS already has migrated to the iPad, making it an excellent “mobility platform”. Certainly, Google is going to compete. The Microsoft offering, despite the major-play backing, is still barely a blip on the radar. webOS is a potential player depending on what HP decides to do. And RIM is in danger of being an also-ran with Symbian. So who will win the mobility race?


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