Tag: ios

Watching For Answers

The Apple Watch finally goes on sale this month. In the days leading up to availability, we’ve seen criticisms and negative reactions fall along two tracks:

  1. What is the point of a smartwatch?
  2. And why would anyone spend $10,000 to $17,000 on a gold version of what can be had for $379?

Say what you want about the Apple wearable, but those are not the right questions to ask.

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Using MiniKeePass with Dropbox

This post is going to be of interest to only a very specific demographic, but based on my web site stats, it seems necessary. Since writing my “story” – it barely qualifies as a “review” – of MiniKeePass, it has (surprisingly) become the most popular item on my blog. And tracking the Google search referrals, by far the biggest impetus for coming to my site has been in a quest for the answer to “how to use MiniKeePass with Dropbox”.

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Secure Password Management with KeePass and MiniKeePass

I always advise users to create hard-to-guess passwords, never re-use them across sites, and change them semi-regularly. The push-back I get is that this can be a daunting task to try and remember a myriad of constantly-changing credentials, no matter how good the mnemonic techniques may be. But one look at the growing list of high-visibility break-ins and security compromises is all you need as incentive. Why make it easy for crackers to jump from one service to another just because you were a victim of limited brain cells devoted to passwords?

Call it “do as I say, not as I do”, the Cobbler’s Children syndrome, or just simple laziness, but despite the best of intentions I was not following my own advice.

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This Just In: GPS Tracks Location

On Apr 20, two researchers presenting at the “Where 2.0″ conference disclosed that Apple iPhones (and 3G iPads) were found to contain accessible location tracking histories. The “Apple is tracking you” meme spread like wildfire on the Internet and by nightfall had made its way to the evening news, complete with overly simplified technical hand-waving and obligatory man-on-the-street outrage.

In the clearer light of day, some revelations: (continue reading…)


Has The iPhone Peaked?

Business Insider ran what I thought was a very interesting Android vs iPhone survey asking users why they chose one platform over another. I agree with their “takeaway points” from the resulting data, but I was particularly intrigued by two of their extended conclusions in regard to the Android onslaught:

  1. “It increases the pressure on the iPhone 5 to be a humdinger of an upgrade.”
  2. “App selection is not as important as most people think.”

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On Openness, Fragmentation, And Other Android Traits

According to the latest Nielsen numbers, Android, iOS, and BlackBerry are nearly neck-and-neck in smartphone OS market share with 29%, 27%, and 27% respectively. When looking at the graph, one thing stands out in comparing new leader Android to its nearest neighbors… (continue reading…)


WordPress App Recant

Earlier this year, WordPress released v2.6 of their iOS app. You could tell from the announcement that the developers were very excited about many new features that had been added. Unfortunately, it seems that few outside of the development team were able to experience all these great features, because the released product did not seem to work well. The primary problem was that it would complain about login/password problems and not let you into your own site. It was slammed in the iTunes app reviews.

Shortly thereafter, a new 2.6.1 version was released to fix the login problems. The developers were profusely apologetic for the authentication errors. My 2nd install certainly got past the password, but it would just hang forever. I figured it was another bust. I went to the iTunes feedback ready to blast then with a low rating. But I happened to notice that at least one other reviewer had the same difficulties as I, and they resolved the problem by wiping the app and doing a complete re-install. Hmmm, worth a shot.

And what a difference it made! When I installed a fresh new copy, I was able to configure for my site and finally see what the developers were initially so excited about. WYSIWYG editor, photo uploads, video support, location-based posting. Bravo! I hurriedly went back to iTunes to post a 5-star rating.

I should have been more thorough in my testing. Yes, it offers all that and more. But when time comes to actually save the blog entry, no dice. It looks like it works, but there’s nothing there on the site – not even in Draft form. Darn. Pretty useless.

Now how do I retract my iTunes positive rating?


The Evolution Of Smartphones, By The Numbers [And Why Apple May Dominate The Next Round]

In 2007, Apple energized the smartphone industry with the introduction of the first-gen iPhone. Within a year, they had gone from a non-player in the cellular phone market to an innovative industry leader. Indeed, Apple’s tremendous success in the marketplace is exemplified by their capture of 48% of the Q1 2010 mobile phone revenues, despite being limited to GSM carriers and garnering only an estimated 3% of the total handset market.

If rumors of a CDMA phone in 2011 are correct, Apple is poised to once again make an historic leap, this time not for its innovative technological advances, but in terms of a significant – possibly even dominant – market share increase. In order to explain why this might be, we need to understand how smartphone adoption has evolved (very rapidly) over the past 3 years.

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Counting Down To The Top 3

Ouch. First Microsoft unceremoniously kills the Kin device, and now the press buries the first Windows Phone 7. If sales will tank as predicted, is MS long for the mobile market?

Lackluster Windows Phone adoption will ultimately reduce the smartphone competition to Apple iOS, Google Android, and the forthcoming BlackBerry 6.0. As for WebOS? HP does not plan to focus on smartphones and will instead push for it as the embedded OS on all their future appliance platforms (particularly tablets).

Soon there will be three. (And quite frankly, I am seeing RIM wilt quickly under the weight of the  iPhone/Droid onslaught. If Corporate America ever concedes their love affair with the BlackBerry Enterprise Server as a means of Draconian IT control, BB is toast.)


Smartphone Tethering

Long ago, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, computers went on-net – whether “on net” was “the Internet”, CompuServe, or (for the old-timers) something like FIDOnet – with a device called a “modem”. (Modems got their name because they MOdulated and DEModulated analog telephone signals to transmit binary data.)

In  these days of digital high-speed broadband and FIOS, a genuine “mo-dem” is somewhat of an ancient relic in the vernacular. However, if you have a smartphone, it can act as an analog (no pun intended) of an old-school telephony modem for getting your laptop onto the Internet when there is no other access available.

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